The Magic Penny, Inc.
sabisierraleone:

Freetown

sabisierraleone:

Freetown


Rural Sierra Leone

Rural Sierra Leone

sabisierraleone:

Approaching Freetown

sabisierraleone:

Approaching Freetown

sabisierraleone:

Tokeh Beach

sabisierraleone:

Tokeh Beach

alpha-k:

sabisierraleone:

Cotton Tree, Freetown

I miss Freetown,

alpha-k:

sabisierraleone:

Cotton Tree, Freetown

I miss Freetown,

mangoestho:

SALONE (Sierra Leone) country cloth.
Perhaps the simplest woven cloth in West Africa is country cloth.  It made in the interior of Liberia (Lofa County) and in a arc around it which included Ivory Coast, Burkina Faso, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Mali.  The cotton and skills to weave it probably came into the forest zone with people migrating from the Sahel because of other population pressures, war and famine. Traditionally Liberian country cloth was handspun, hand dyed and hand woven cotton, done in about four inch wide strips on a simple foot treadle loom.  A standard bolt is about 36 yards long.  The weaving pieces shown to the left are carved heddle pulleys, heddles, batten and reeds, boat and spinning spindles. Often the cloth was plain white, but natural dyes like indigo and kola were used to dye the warp to create linear stripes.  The weft was always left natural.  To prepare the loom the warp would be set-up on sticks in the yard of the house.  When the long strip is finished it is cut intopieces of the desired length which are then sewn together a piece of cloth.  Traditionally clothing was made without much tailoring.  A piece of cloth with enough strips to achieve the desired with would be partially sewn together on the sides and an opened for the head would be cut and sewn off. The neck and pocket are often embroidered.  This also serves to strengthen these stress areas.
Further north and east similar cloth was woven on similar looms, but the strips were generally wider

mangoestho:

SALONE (Sierra Leone) country cloth.

Perhaps the simplest woven cloth in West Africa is country cloth.  It made in the interior of Liberia (Lofa County) and in a arc around it which included Ivory Coast, Burkina Faso, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Mali.  The cotton and skills to weave it probably came into the forest zone with people migrating from the Sahel Pieces of Liberian foot treadle loombecause of other population pressures, war and famine. Traditionally Liberian country cloth was handspun, hand dyed and hand woven cotton, done in about four inch wide strips on a simple foot treadle loom.  A standard bolt is about 36 yards long. Traditional gown (boubou) made with country cloth and embroidered, Liberia The weaving pieces shown to the left are carved heddle pulleys, heddles, batten and reeds, boat and spinning spindles. Often the cloth was plain white, but natural dyes like indigo and kola were used to dye the warp to create linear stripes.  The weft was always left natural.  To prepare the loom the warp would be set-up on sticks in the yard of the house.  When the long strip is finished it is cut intoTraditional shirt made with country cloth and embroidered, Liberiapieces of the desired length which are then sewn together a piece of cloth.  TraditionallyTraditional gown (boubou) made with country cloth and embroidered, Liberia clothing was made without much tailoring.  A piece of cloth with enough strips to achieve the desired with would be partially sewn together on the sides and an opened for the head would be cut and sewn off. The neck and pocket are often embroidered.  This also serves to strengthen these stress areas.

Further north and east similar cloth was woven on similar looms, but the strips were generally wider

unicef:

It’s ‪#‎MandelaDay‬, which this year is especially poignant. So let’s come together, like these school children from Ghana did in this photo taken yesterday, to celebrate Nelson’s 95th birthday and his achievements.
Let’s try to share this birthday card 9500 times!
We also prepared a video honoring this great champion for children: http://youtu.be/HlKiyxULVP0

unicef:

It’s ‪#‎MandelaDay‬, which this year is especially poignant. So let’s come together, like these school children from Ghana did in this photo taken yesterday, to celebrate Nelson’s 95th birthday and his achievements.

Let’s try to share this birthday card 9500 times!

We also prepared a video honoring this great champion for children: http://youtu.be/HlKiyxULVP0


After the rains

After the rains

PHOTOGRAPH OF BAI BUREH, NATIONAL HERO OF SIERRA LEONE

This is a print made from the original 1898 photograph showing the famous warrior, Bai Bureh, in captivity in Ascension Town, Sierra Leone in 1898. The photograph was discovered last year in an old album kept by a former British officer. It was originally taken by Lieutenant Arthur Greer, a Lieutenant in the West Indian Regiment. This is the military unit which fought Bai Bureh’s warriors in the Port Lokko region during the Hut Tax War. Arthur Greer was later killed in the Siege of Coomasie in the Gold Coast.


All proceeds from the sale of these re-prints will go to The Magic Penny……….

PHOTOGRAPH OF BAI BUREH, NATIONAL HERO OF SIERRA LEONE

This is a print made from the original 1898 photograph showing the famous warrior, Bai Bureh, in captivity in Ascension Town, Sierra Leone in 1898. The photograph was discovered last year in an old album kept by a former British officer. It was originally taken by Lieutenant Arthur Greer, a Lieutenant in the West Indian Regiment. This is the military unit which fought Bai Bureh’s warriors in the Port Lokko region during the Hut Tax War. Arthur Greer was later killed in the Siege of Coomasie in the Gold Coast.

All proceeds from the sale of these re-prints will go to The Magic Penny……….